Monday, October 12, 2009

DOG AND CAT DAY! KICKS OFF WITH SOME DOG GONE GOOD GIVEAWAYS!

GIVEAWAY ENDED
WHAT THE DOG SAW
BY MALCOLM GLADWELL
ABOUT THE BOOK:

What is the difference between choking and panicking? Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard-but only one variety of ketchup? What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers? What does hair dye tell us about the history of the 20
th century?

In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point; Blink; and Outliers. Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period.

Here is the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling inventions of the pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz. Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the "dog whisperer" who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand. He explores intelligence tests and ethnic profiling and "hindsight bias" and why it was that everyone in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate.

"Good writing," Gladwell says in his preface, "does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head." What the Dog Saw is yet another example of the buoyant spirit and unflagging curiosity that have made Malcolm Gladwell our most brilliant investigator of the hidden extraordinary.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Malcolm Gladwell is a former business and science writer at the Washington Post. He is currently a staff writer for The New Yorker. Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer with The New Yorker magazine since 1996. His 1999 profile of Ron Popeil won a National Magazine Award, and in 2005 he was named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People. He is the author of three books, "The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference," (2000) , "Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking" (2005), and "Outliers: The Story of Success" (2008) all of which were number one New York Times bestsellers.

From 1987 to 1996, he was a reporter with the Washington Post, where he covered business, science, and then served as the newspaper's New York City bureau chief. He graduated from the University of Toronto, Trinity College, with a degree in history. He was born in England, grew up in rural Ontario, and now lives in New York City.


GIVEAWAY

THANKS TO MIRIAM AND THE
HACHETTE BOOK GROUP, I HAVE

5 COPIES OF THIS FABULOUS BOOK
TO GIVE AWAY. HERE IS WHAT YOU
NEED TO DO TO WIN A COPY!


RULES:

--U.S. AND CANADIAN RESIDENTS ONLY
--NO P. O. BOXES
---INCLUDE YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS
IN CASE YOU WIN!
--ALL COMMENTS MUST BE SEPARATE TO
COUNT AS MORE THAN ONE!


HOW TO ENTER:
(VERY EASY)


+1 ENTRY: GO TO "Q & A: DOG DAYS", AN ARTICLE IN THE NEW YORKER, BY BEN GREENMAN, AND READ ABOUT MALCOLM GLADWELL'S TAKE ON CESAR MILLAN, "THE DOG WHISPERER". AS PART OF WHAT THE DOG SAW, THIS ARTICLE WILL GIVE YOU AN IDEA ABOUT GLADWELL'S WORK, IF YOU HAVEN'T READ ANY OF HIS WRITING BEFORE. TELL SOMETHING YOU FOUND OUT READING THE ARTICLE.

THAT'S ALL THERE IS TO IT!
THIS GIVEAWAY WILL END
AT 6 PM, NOVEMBER 1

GOOD LUCK!

COME BACK, COMO
GIVEAWAY HAS ENDED!
WINNING THE HEART OF
A RELUCTANT DOG
BY STEVEN WINN

ABOUT THE BOOK:

This is the story of a unique journey: one man's valiant quest to win the love of a truly one-of-a-kind dog, a creature usually thought of as man's best friend. With humour and pathos, Winn describes the exasperating but ultimately rewarding effects Como had on his family, the ordeals he and his dog endured together, and the greatest lesson Como taught him: that loving a dog can somehow make us more human.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Award-winning journalist and fiction writer Steven Winn was a staff writer at the San Francisco Chronicle. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow in Fiction at Stanford University and a founding staff member of the Seattle Weekly, his work has appeared in publications from Good Housekeeping, Parenting, and Parents, to Sports Illustrated, AARP magazine, the Utne Reader, and the National Lampoon. He has appeared on 20/20, the Today Show, NBC Nightly News, AandE Biography, and NPR.
GIVEAWAY

COMO IS SOME GREAT DOG!
READ AND FALL IN LOVE!
I HAVE
ONE NEW ADVANCED COPY
TO GIVE AWAY !


RULES:

---U.S. AND CANADIAN RESIDENTS ONLY
---NO P.O. BOXES PLEASE
---YOU MUST PUT YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS
IN YOUR COMMENT SO I DON'T
HAVE TO HUNT FOR IT!


HOW TO ENTER:
(VERY EASY)

+1 ENTRY: COMMENT AND TELL ME THE NAME OF A FICTIONAL DOG OR CAT FROM A BOOK YOU HAVE READ. TELL THE NAME OF THE BOOK AS WELL IF YOU CAN

THAT'S ALL THERE IS TO IT!
THIS GIVEAWAY WILL END TOMORROW,
OCTOBER 13, AT NOON!


34 comments:

fredamans said...

Thank you for the entry.

freda.mans[at]sympatico.ca

What the Dog Saw is on my booklist to read. After reading the Q & A, I'm even more keen. I am going to look into the section on changing your phrasing while talking at your pet.

Bethie said...

Please enter me. We just watched Marley and Me. I cry every time!! My kids have the "kiddie" version. I think Marley is the only dog worse than our Rocco!

lizzi0915 at aol dot com

rhapsodyinbooks said...

No need to enter me; I'm just here to check out the friends' pictures on Dog and Cat Day!!!

Pam said...

I learned that dogs are our most perfect genetic creation, that we've bred them to relate to us as well as they do.

melacan at hotmail dot om

Pam said...

The name of the dog in Walking in Circles Before Lying Down was Chuck.

melacan at hotmail dot com

Momma Hunt said...

I am a follower and would love to be entered for the giveaway. Plus I love the doxie photos!

MUM said...

Mrs. Murphy from the Mrs. Murphy Mysteries by Rita Mae Brown.

Marie
utah91960(at)yahoo(dot)com

scottsgal said...

Pearl is the German Shorthair Pointer in Robert B. Parker's Spenser series of books - she's in them all and quite the good girl

msboatgal at aol.com

bekki1820cb said...

this is going to sound ridiculous...but the only book with a dog in it is Shiloh. so Shiloh is my entry. thanks for the chance
bekki1820cb@gmail.com

Jo said...

An experiemnt in Russia using wild foxes turned out puppy looking and acting animals after 40 years of very selective breedig. And I'm definitely going to be looking that up - I want details. =)

jump_up_thrice[at]hotmail[dot]com

Jo said...

The dog in the Stephanie Plum books by Janet Evanovich is named Bob.

jump_up_thrice[at]hotmail[dot]com

Rebecca N. said...

He has failed with only two dogs.

Thanks for the great giveaway!

imsosweepy { at } gmail { dot } com

Rebecca N. said...

When I was a little girl, about 11 or so, I read a book called, "A Dog Called Kitty". The dog was called Kitty. :) I really liked that book as a kid. Thanks!

imsosweepy { at } gmail { dot } com

Nancye said...

I think about Marley. What a great book and movie!

Thanks for the giveaway!

nancyecdavis AT bellsouth DOT net

Linda K said...

Cesar Milan is credited with his skill of phrasing..deals with the vocabulary and syntax of gesture and movement

lkish77123 at gmail dot com

Linda K said...

I just got the book Homer's Odyssey about a blind cat named Homer.

lkish77123 at gmail dot com

~The Book Pixie said...

Um, well let's see. Oh there is Pilot from Jane Eyre. I like the name cause my dad is a pilot.

~Briana
thebookpixie[at]yahoo[dot]com

Wrighty said...

Marley from Marley and Me is a huge favorite that made me laugh and cry. Of course it's always funny when it's someone else's dog and not one of my three (golden retriever, chocolate lab and cocker spaniel) that's acting up. I'm not sure who has been more work, the three dogs or the three kids! I do adore them all though...most of the time!
Thanks for your giveaways!

5wrights1[at]verizon[dot]net

FrankSandy said...

Cats are in Lilian Jackson Braun's novels and in Shirley Rousseau Murphy novels. walkerd@primus.ca

ossmcalc said...

I discovered that even Cesar Millan would concede that there are occasionally bad apples in the dog world—dogs that are the way they are because of some fundamental defect—the same way the human world occasionally gives us a Jeffrey Dahmer.

Anonymous said...

Waggy was one of the dogs in New Tricks by David Rosenfelt.

bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

Anonymous said...

From Q&A I learned there is a whole way to talk to and relate to dogs, so phraseology is real important.

bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

ossmcalc said...

I have not read any of his writings. I learned that he actually thinks that he possesses a profoundly fundamental gift, which is the ability to create order from chaos. I also learned about the term "phrasing."

Thank you,

Christine
womackcm@sbcglobal.net

Anonymous said...

Shirley Rousseau Murphy's fictional talking cats.
walkermisc@primus.ca

Anonymous said...

Midnight Louie created by Carole Nelson Douglas. walkermisc@primus.ca

MarionG said...

Hi I learned that the study of human movement is called phasing. I'd never heard of that before. polo-puppy-fluffy AT hotmail *dot* com
I would love to read this book. Cheers.

Amy said...

What the Dog Saw looks like a really interesting book! Malcolm Gladwell is very intelligent and a little wacky, my favorite combination! On television he thinks Jesse Jackson is kind of a clown but live he is an impressive man. This is due to something called posturing and the reason some people can captivate a live audience when they speak to them. It's also the reason Cesar is able to get the dogs to listen to him!

Thank you for this giveaway!

Aimala127[at]gmail[dot]com

Marilu said...

Hi. thanks for the entry!
I would love to read this book. My neighbours have actually suggested that I call "the Dog Whisperer"!
One thing I learned was the :the Dog Whisperer" has only been unsuccessful with 2 dogs! The reason that stands out is not only because that is a great success record, but the reasons that he wasn't successful with those 2! It definitely made me chuckle!

lovemykidsandbooks(at)gmail(dot) com

catss99 said...

I liked his comments about how we have systematically bred dogs for their ability to get along with us, so it’s not surprising that they are so tuned in with our moods.

I really love this author and want this book!
amanda
catss99@yahoo.com

Nancye said...

I learned from the New Yorker article that some of the ways that dogs are trained also work on kids with developmental issues. Interesting. This could possibly change the way young children are taught.

nancyecdavis AT bellsouth DOT net

Wrighty said...

I didn't do my entry right before. I think Cesar is fascinating! It's amazing how he can change an animal's behavior. From the article it was interesting to read how dogs have been genetically altered over the years to meet certain needs.

5wrights1[at]verizon[dot]net

Andrea said...

I learned that dogs have been bred to get along with us and that there was an experiment that bred foxes to get along with humans. After forty years of breeding, the foxes resembled puppies.
andie.v107(at)yahoo(dot)com

Margie said...

Please enter me for What the Dog Saw. Looks interesting. (Sorry I missed your Como book deadline!)

mtakala1 AT yahoo DOT com

Margie said...

Extra entry...from the article...

Fascinating that puppy tendencies can be bred into foxes!

mtakala1 AT yahoo DOT com

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